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Technology in the bedroom
Parenting Power Admin February 2, 2017 No Comments

Technology in the bedroom

We need to start by thanking everyone for the wonderful response we’ve had about #NoPhoneFamilyDay! Please keep sharing our posts and tweets and spreading the word.

Now, let’s get back to today’s message:

In order to connect with ourselves (and to be more pleasant when connecting with others,) we all have to look after our sleep.

As parents, we need to be creating a positive environment in which sleep can happen, along with requiring our kids to get the amount of sleep they need.

How much sleep do they need?

The American Academy of Sleep Medicine says:

– Infants 4 months to 12 months should sleep 12 to 16 hours per 24 hours (including naps) on a regular basis to promote optimal health.

– Children 1 to 2 years of age should sleep 11 to 14 hours per 24 hours (including naps) on a regular basis to promote optimal health

– Children 3 to 5 years of age should sleep 10 to 13 hours per 24 hours (including naps) on a regular basis to promote optimal health

– Children 6 to 12 years of age should sleep 9 to 12 hours per 24 hours on a regular basis to promote optimal health.

– Teenagers 13 to 18 years of age should sleep 8 to 10 hours per 24 hours on a regular basis to promote optimal health.

What’s getting in the way?

One of the greatest detractors of sleep for children and adults alike, is having technology in the bedroom. Notifications of incoming messages, along with staying up to play games and chat with people can impede a good night’s sleep.

Many kids and parents tell us that they have to have their phones in their room because of the need for an alarm. That excuse is easily circumvented by buying an alarm clock.

A fascinating piece of research around this issue is quoted in The Teenage Brain by Jensen and Nutt:

“Researchers at a sleep disorders clinic at JFK Medical Center in New Jersey estimate that one in five teenagers actually interrupts his or her sleep to text.

The participants in their study, all of whom had come to the clinic for sleep issues, reported sending and receiving and average of 34 texts every night – after going to bed!

The texts were sent and received from ten minutes to four hours after these teens went to bed and they were awakened by a text message at least once a night.

Girls were more likely to text after going to bed, whereas boys were more likely to be awake, playing games on their cell phones.”

Ultimately, ensuring that our kids are getting the right amount of sleep is about making a family plan and holding the kids accountable.

Have you made sleep a priority in your family?
Do your kids have technology in their bedrooms? If so why?
How much sleep should each of your kids be getting?

The American Society of Sleep Medicine reminds us that:

“Regularly sleeping fewer than the number of recommended hours is associated with attention, behavior, and learning problems. Insufficient sleep also increases the risk of accidents, injuries, hypertension, obesity, diabetes, and depression. Insufficient sleep in teenagers is associated with increased risk of self-harm, suicidal thoughts, and suicide attempts”

Our kids have the opportunity to connect with so many people each day. When we set them up for success by requiring them to take responsibility for healthy sleep, we are making it better for everyone.

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